The Practical Philosophy of a Global Utopia

Glen MartinAs he prepares to head to India for the fourteenth session of the Provisional World Parliament, DWF board member and professional philosopher Dr. Glen Martin has just released his latest work, One World Renaissance: Holistic Planetary Transformation Through a Global Social Contract. DWF supported Martin’s multiple appearances in the San Francisco area during his recent book tour, which included an unprecedented appearance on KPFA radio (the Pacifica Radio Network’s Berkeley affiliate). Glen’s ambitious book has been called “a practical and inspired effort on behalf of world unity” by the Honorable A. P. Misra, retired Justice of the Supreme Court of India and was reviewed here favorably by veteran federalist Ron Glossop. Dr. Martin shows why our predicament urgently requires, as he puts it, “the creation of a global social contract that can only be adopted through a profound philosophic shift to holism—the same evolutionary holism that has swept all of the world’s sciences.” Humanity can never flourish, according to Martin, unless we build a well-governed world that leaves behind our fragmented system of self-interested nation-states and global corporations bent on profit. Dr. Martin mines the thought of the world’s leading philosophers and social theorists to create a synthesis that goes beyond his previous books such as Millennium Dawn and Triumph of Civilization. Glen is the president of the World Constitution and Parliament Association (WCPA), which authored the Earth Constitution over a period of three decades, and which convenes the Provisional World Parliament that meets periodically to pass model world government legislation.


NOTE: The Democratic World Federalists are committed to expressing a wide range of views on the vision of creating a peaceful, just, and sustainable world through a democratic World Federation. The views expressed in this article represents that commitment and not necessarily our official position.


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World Trade Deals Undermine World Democracy

We the CorporationsByron Belitsos
Managing Editor

A world constitution would provide for a bill of rights for world citizens; constitutionally defined rights for member states; and democratically legislated regulations that would cover such matters as world trade. It would make sure such rules would be interpreted by independent world federal courts. Contrast the wisdom of that approach with so-called free-trade treaties Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). These treaties create a separate global judicial system that is exclusively for the use of corporations based on rules written in relative secrecy by elites operating on behalf of the world’s largest corporations. So, how is it that world affairs have evolved so far away from the prospect of a true world democracy that—as contemplated under the TTIP proposal, for example—corporations across the EU and U.S. would be allowed to sue governments before a tribunal of corporate lawyers? They would be able to challenge the laws they don’t like, and seek massive compensation—from taxpayers—if these are deemed to affect their “future anticipated profits.” The TPP was covertly negotiated by unelected officials and corporate leaders from twelve Pacific Rim nations, but our own Congress was denied access to its deliberations. The critics of these proposed treaties abound, but one writer, independent historian Eric Zuesse, connects more dots than others in a lengthly and speculative essay, posing the issue ultimately as a battle between the quest for a democratic world government and what he calls “an international mega-corporate dictatorship.” And, quite recently, even the UN has called for the suspension of the TTIP talks. Alfred de Zayas, a UN human rights campaigner and the UN’s special rapporteur on promotion of a democratic and equitable international order, recently stated: “We don’t want a dystopian future in which corporations and not democratically elected governments call the shots. We don’t want an international order akin to post-democracy or post-law.” A democratic world constitution would enshrine the entire world’s people as the sovereigns, rather than any one subset or portion of the people; it would specifically outlaw and inhibit any possibility of rule by international corporations or some global faction bent on world dictatorship. And this may be just what these new trade deals are pointing toward.


NOTE: The Democratic World Federalists are committed to expressing a wide range of views on the vision of creating a peaceful, just, and sustainable world through a democratic World Federation. The views expressed in this article represents that commitment and not necessarily our official position.

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